Read-to-Know-Basis
Read-to-Know-Basis
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bradofarrell:


Big Brother 15 is beautiful and disgusting and amazing and you should be watching it. In the above gif set, contestant Aaryn flipped over a black contestant’s mattress then mocked her in a “black voice.” Candice (who is black but was adopted by a white family) feels so powerless that she can only sob in another room. When Aaryn is confronted about her racism she asserts that she never said anything racist.
You almost never see or hear this kind of racism in fiction or even in most reality TV shows where it can be edited out if it doesn’t fit the storyline. But the all-seeing live 24/7 cameras on Big Brother capture everything and the fans who watch the the live internet feeds pressured the producers into showing the racist behavior going on in the house after it was edited out during the first few episodes of the season.
The racism you tend to see in media is generally a big event that has to fit into a storyline and rarely a this kind of lower-frequency racism that is much more common.
People like Aaryn think they’re not being racist so long as they never say “the n word” or other powerful acts that have been defined as “racist behavior” to them by the media. People like Aaryn do not understand what their actions mean to other people because this kind of casual racism (and the impact it has on others) is so rarely seen in the media that colors her perception of the world.
This is why the existence of honest and accountable media like Big Brother 15 is so culturally important. People know racism exist, but those who don’t experience it directly do not understand the nuance and specifics. But a show like this, without the veil of fictionalization, can make it crystal clear. This fantastic comment from a white Big Brother fan illustrates what the show has taught her:


Frankly, if this is what millions of minorities go through in this country every day, I’m shocked there isn’t more racial tension in this country than there is. It really shows how dignified people can be in the face of adversity, and I’m going to have a lot harder time holding it against people of color who “overreact” to this type of thing in the future.
The George Zimmerman trial is an excellent example… I firmly believe the man deserved to be found not guilty and I think he was not profiling the Martin kid. But now I’m beginning to understand how the whole fiasco feels like one big slap in the face to people who have to deal with racism and perceived racism in every aspect of their lives. I would be second guessing a lot of things too if I had experiences like what I’m witnessing on this show.


The American version of Big Brother has a good track record when it comes to editing their footage in a way that makes the emergent storyline comprehensible to viewers. Some people have said that CBS should forcibly eject Aaryn from the show, but I think CBS made the right choice. We wanted “reality” and we got it. I’m glad that, rather than retreating into the safety of censorship, Big Brother 15 is forcing its (mostly white) viewers to confront the unseen ugliness of their own reality.
bradofarrell:


Big Brother 15 is beautiful and disgusting and amazing and you should be watching it. In the above gif set, contestant Aaryn flipped over a black contestant’s mattress then mocked her in a “black voice.” Candice (who is black but was adopted by a white family) feels so powerless that she can only sob in another room. When Aaryn is confronted about her racism she asserts that she never said anything racist.
You almost never see or hear this kind of racism in fiction or even in most reality TV shows where it can be edited out if it doesn’t fit the storyline. But the all-seeing live 24/7 cameras on Big Brother capture everything and the fans who watch the the live internet feeds pressured the producers into showing the racist behavior going on in the house after it was edited out during the first few episodes of the season.
The racism you tend to see in media is generally a big event that has to fit into a storyline and rarely a this kind of lower-frequency racism that is much more common.
People like Aaryn think they’re not being racist so long as they never say “the n word” or other powerful acts that have been defined as “racist behavior” to them by the media. People like Aaryn do not understand what their actions mean to other people because this kind of casual racism (and the impact it has on others) is so rarely seen in the media that colors her perception of the world.
This is why the existence of honest and accountable media like Big Brother 15 is so culturally important. People know racism exist, but those who don’t experience it directly do not understand the nuance and specifics. But a show like this, without the veil of fictionalization, can make it crystal clear. This fantastic comment from a white Big Brother fan illustrates what the show has taught her:


Frankly, if this is what millions of minorities go through in this country every day, I’m shocked there isn’t more racial tension in this country than there is. It really shows how dignified people can be in the face of adversity, and I’m going to have a lot harder time holding it against people of color who “overreact” to this type of thing in the future.
The George Zimmerman trial is an excellent example… I firmly believe the man deserved to be found not guilty and I think he was not profiling the Martin kid. But now I’m beginning to understand how the whole fiasco feels like one big slap in the face to people who have to deal with racism and perceived racism in every aspect of their lives. I would be second guessing a lot of things too if I had experiences like what I’m witnessing on this show.


The American version of Big Brother has a good track record when it comes to editing their footage in a way that makes the emergent storyline comprehensible to viewers. Some people have said that CBS should forcibly eject Aaryn from the show, but I think CBS made the right choice. We wanted “reality” and we got it. I’m glad that, rather than retreating into the safety of censorship, Big Brother 15 is forcing its (mostly white) viewers to confront the unseen ugliness of their own reality.
bradofarrell:


Big Brother 15 is beautiful and disgusting and amazing and you should be watching it. In the above gif set, contestant Aaryn flipped over a black contestant’s mattress then mocked her in a “black voice.” Candice (who is black but was adopted by a white family) feels so powerless that she can only sob in another room. When Aaryn is confronted about her racism she asserts that she never said anything racist.
You almost never see or hear this kind of racism in fiction or even in most reality TV shows where it can be edited out if it doesn’t fit the storyline. But the all-seeing live 24/7 cameras on Big Brother capture everything and the fans who watch the the live internet feeds pressured the producers into showing the racist behavior going on in the house after it was edited out during the first few episodes of the season.
The racism you tend to see in media is generally a big event that has to fit into a storyline and rarely a this kind of lower-frequency racism that is much more common.
People like Aaryn think they’re not being racist so long as they never say “the n word” or other powerful acts that have been defined as “racist behavior” to them by the media. People like Aaryn do not understand what their actions mean to other people because this kind of casual racism (and the impact it has on others) is so rarely seen in the media that colors her perception of the world.
This is why the existence of honest and accountable media like Big Brother 15 is so culturally important. People know racism exist, but those who don’t experience it directly do not understand the nuance and specifics. But a show like this, without the veil of fictionalization, can make it crystal clear. This fantastic comment from a white Big Brother fan illustrates what the show has taught her:


Frankly, if this is what millions of minorities go through in this country every day, I’m shocked there isn’t more racial tension in this country than there is. It really shows how dignified people can be in the face of adversity, and I’m going to have a lot harder time holding it against people of color who “overreact” to this type of thing in the future.
The George Zimmerman trial is an excellent example… I firmly believe the man deserved to be found not guilty and I think he was not profiling the Martin kid. But now I’m beginning to understand how the whole fiasco feels like one big slap in the face to people who have to deal with racism and perceived racism in every aspect of their lives. I would be second guessing a lot of things too if I had experiences like what I’m witnessing on this show.


The American version of Big Brother has a good track record when it comes to editing their footage in a way that makes the emergent storyline comprehensible to viewers. Some people have said that CBS should forcibly eject Aaryn from the show, but I think CBS made the right choice. We wanted “reality” and we got it. I’m glad that, rather than retreating into the safety of censorship, Big Brother 15 is forcing its (mostly white) viewers to confront the unseen ugliness of their own reality.
bradofarrell:


Big Brother 15 is beautiful and disgusting and amazing and you should be watching it. In the above gif set, contestant Aaryn flipped over a black contestant’s mattress then mocked her in a “black voice.” Candice (who is black but was adopted by a white family) feels so powerless that she can only sob in another room. When Aaryn is confronted about her racism she asserts that she never said anything racist.
You almost never see or hear this kind of racism in fiction or even in most reality TV shows where it can be edited out if it doesn’t fit the storyline. But the all-seeing live 24/7 cameras on Big Brother capture everything and the fans who watch the the live internet feeds pressured the producers into showing the racist behavior going on in the house after it was edited out during the first few episodes of the season.
The racism you tend to see in media is generally a big event that has to fit into a storyline and rarely a this kind of lower-frequency racism that is much more common.
People like Aaryn think they’re not being racist so long as they never say “the n word” or other powerful acts that have been defined as “racist behavior” to them by the media. People like Aaryn do not understand what their actions mean to other people because this kind of casual racism (and the impact it has on others) is so rarely seen in the media that colors her perception of the world.
This is why the existence of honest and accountable media like Big Brother 15 is so culturally important. People know racism exist, but those who don’t experience it directly do not understand the nuance and specifics. But a show like this, without the veil of fictionalization, can make it crystal clear. This fantastic comment from a white Big Brother fan illustrates what the show has taught her:


Frankly, if this is what millions of minorities go through in this country every day, I’m shocked there isn’t more racial tension in this country than there is. It really shows how dignified people can be in the face of adversity, and I’m going to have a lot harder time holding it against people of color who “overreact” to this type of thing in the future.
The George Zimmerman trial is an excellent example… I firmly believe the man deserved to be found not guilty and I think he was not profiling the Martin kid. But now I’m beginning to understand how the whole fiasco feels like one big slap in the face to people who have to deal with racism and perceived racism in every aspect of their lives. I would be second guessing a lot of things too if I had experiences like what I’m witnessing on this show.


The American version of Big Brother has a good track record when it comes to editing their footage in a way that makes the emergent storyline comprehensible to viewers. Some people have said that CBS should forcibly eject Aaryn from the show, but I think CBS made the right choice. We wanted “reality” and we got it. I’m glad that, rather than retreating into the safety of censorship, Big Brother 15 is forcing its (mostly white) viewers to confront the unseen ugliness of their own reality.
bradofarrell:


Big Brother 15 is beautiful and disgusting and amazing and you should be watching it. In the above gif set, contestant Aaryn flipped over a black contestant’s mattress then mocked her in a “black voice.” Candice (who is black but was adopted by a white family) feels so powerless that she can only sob in another room. When Aaryn is confronted about her racism she asserts that she never said anything racist.
You almost never see or hear this kind of racism in fiction or even in most reality TV shows where it can be edited out if it doesn’t fit the storyline. But the all-seeing live 24/7 cameras on Big Brother capture everything and the fans who watch the the live internet feeds pressured the producers into showing the racist behavior going on in the house after it was edited out during the first few episodes of the season.
The racism you tend to see in media is generally a big event that has to fit into a storyline and rarely a this kind of lower-frequency racism that is much more common.
People like Aaryn think they’re not being racist so long as they never say “the n word” or other powerful acts that have been defined as “racist behavior” to them by the media. People like Aaryn do not understand what their actions mean to other people because this kind of casual racism (and the impact it has on others) is so rarely seen in the media that colors her perception of the world.
This is why the existence of honest and accountable media like Big Brother 15 is so culturally important. People know racism exist, but those who don’t experience it directly do not understand the nuance and specifics. But a show like this, without the veil of fictionalization, can make it crystal clear. This fantastic comment from a white Big Brother fan illustrates what the show has taught her:


Frankly, if this is what millions of minorities go through in this country every day, I’m shocked there isn’t more racial tension in this country than there is. It really shows how dignified people can be in the face of adversity, and I’m going to have a lot harder time holding it against people of color who “overreact” to this type of thing in the future.
The George Zimmerman trial is an excellent example… I firmly believe the man deserved to be found not guilty and I think he was not profiling the Martin kid. But now I’m beginning to understand how the whole fiasco feels like one big slap in the face to people who have to deal with racism and perceived racism in every aspect of their lives. I would be second guessing a lot of things too if I had experiences like what I’m witnessing on this show.


The American version of Big Brother has a good track record when it comes to editing their footage in a way that makes the emergent storyline comprehensible to viewers. Some people have said that CBS should forcibly eject Aaryn from the show, but I think CBS made the right choice. We wanted “reality” and we got it. I’m glad that, rather than retreating into the safety of censorship, Big Brother 15 is forcing its (mostly white) viewers to confront the unseen ugliness of their own reality.
bradofarrell:


Big Brother 15 is beautiful and disgusting and amazing and you should be watching it. In the above gif set, contestant Aaryn flipped over a black contestant’s mattress then mocked her in a “black voice.” Candice (who is black but was adopted by a white family) feels so powerless that she can only sob in another room. When Aaryn is confronted about her racism she asserts that she never said anything racist.
You almost never see or hear this kind of racism in fiction or even in most reality TV shows where it can be edited out if it doesn’t fit the storyline. But the all-seeing live 24/7 cameras on Big Brother capture everything and the fans who watch the the live internet feeds pressured the producers into showing the racist behavior going on in the house after it was edited out during the first few episodes of the season.
The racism you tend to see in media is generally a big event that has to fit into a storyline and rarely a this kind of lower-frequency racism that is much more common.
People like Aaryn think they’re not being racist so long as they never say “the n word” or other powerful acts that have been defined as “racist behavior” to them by the media. People like Aaryn do not understand what their actions mean to other people because this kind of casual racism (and the impact it has on others) is so rarely seen in the media that colors her perception of the world.
This is why the existence of honest and accountable media like Big Brother 15 is so culturally important. People know racism exist, but those who don’t experience it directly do not understand the nuance and specifics. But a show like this, without the veil of fictionalization, can make it crystal clear. This fantastic comment from a white Big Brother fan illustrates what the show has taught her:


Frankly, if this is what millions of minorities go through in this country every day, I’m shocked there isn’t more racial tension in this country than there is. It really shows how dignified people can be in the face of adversity, and I’m going to have a lot harder time holding it against people of color who “overreact” to this type of thing in the future.
The George Zimmerman trial is an excellent example… I firmly believe the man deserved to be found not guilty and I think he was not profiling the Martin kid. But now I’m beginning to understand how the whole fiasco feels like one big slap in the face to people who have to deal with racism and perceived racism in every aspect of their lives. I would be second guessing a lot of things too if I had experiences like what I’m witnessing on this show.


The American version of Big Brother has a good track record when it comes to editing their footage in a way that makes the emergent storyline comprehensible to viewers. Some people have said that CBS should forcibly eject Aaryn from the show, but I think CBS made the right choice. We wanted “reality” and we got it. I’m glad that, rather than retreating into the safety of censorship, Big Brother 15 is forcing its (mostly white) viewers to confront the unseen ugliness of their own reality.
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fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

July 16, 1947 - Birthday of Comrade Assata Shakur, Black freedom fighter and communist revolutionary.
As a member of the Black Panthers and Black Liberation Army, a political prisoner, and now living in exile in socialist Cuba with a $2 million federal bounty on her head, Assata has inspired generations of fighters with her commitment to Black liberation and dedication to revolutionary principles.
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This whole ‘Civil Rights’ memetic apparatus has our people stuck on stupid. It has hypnotized Plantation Negros into thinking their history begins with slavery.

That’s why you always hear stupidity like: “The first black doctor” to do such n such and “The first black to graduate from college” and “The first black architect” and “the first black writer”. Straight. Mind. Control. Black people have been doctors, scientists and architects for thousands of years.

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http://denmarkvesey.blogspot.com/ (via howtobeterrell)

I have never in my life thought of this. Never.  That is genocide.

(via liquornspice)

putting this back in rotation.

(via frank-e-fighting-words)

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blackpeopleproblems:

Support from all over the world! 
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"I am a Black Native that can benefit from anti-Blackness because I look mostly Native. If I don’t say I am Black, I benefit from anti-Blackness. If I deny my roots, that is anti-Blackness. If I deny that I benefit from anti-Blackness, that is also anti-Blackness. If I don’t cherish Black people’s beauty in exchange for white beauty, that is anti-Blackness. Calling people we know by their race before their name (ie, Negra ________, La India________) that is anti-Blackness (and anti-Nativeness) because you’re putting their social rank before their humanity.
Anti-Blackness is a disease put in Latin@ cultures. People are so damn anti-Black that it’s normal to them. They don’t see it. They don’t CARE to see it. Some of you aren’t shocked about Zimmerman and some of you want to deny there is a problem.
You can’t call Zimmerman only white, he is a white Latino. What he did in Florida could happen in Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Peru, and Panama, and the results would have been the same—he would have walked. You know this is true.
Look at the Latin@ media. Look at the roles Black actors are reduced to. Look at the comics, look at the cartoons. You will still see Blackface. You will still see Mammies. You will still see them posed as “ignorant.”
Anti-Blackness is real. There are Black people denying their Blackness because of the casta system. Black people are too scared to declare their roots because they could be killed, never get an education, or a job. PEOPLE SHOULD NEVER BE FORCED TO BE ASHAMED OF WHO THEY ARE.
I want to see folks discussing this because a seventeen year old Black boy should not die while white Latin@s are turning their backs on him and his family. Reblogging Trayvon’s pictures isn’t enough."
angrybrownbaby (via reclaimingthelatinatag)
: The Elephant In the Racialised Room: The Conundrum of Black-Arabness
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thewaytosantafe:

crackerhell:


How Actress Laverne Cox Broke The Trans Glass Ceiling
In Neflix’s highly anticipated new series, Orange Is the New Black, a trans woman is actually played by…a trans woman.


praise gawduh

LOVEE